Poverty eradication

Elsevier,

International Journal of Educational Development, Volume 44, September 2015, Pages 42-55

This paper examines the effect of age of marriage on women's schooling outcomes for 36 countries from Sub-Saharan Africa and South West Asia. Girls and young women, particularly those from poor families, face unequal access to education. One factor explaining this is early childhood marriage. This paper contributes to SDG 5 target 3 and SDG 4.
A study of the Massive Food Production Programme (MFPP) in South Africa shows that a focus on raising maize yields in small-scale farming environments did not result in a marked improvement in rural poverty or food security. This article presents results from a study of the MFPP in three villages in the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. This article highlights the interconnection between SDG 1 - No Poverty and SDG 2 - Zero hunger and points to ways in which improvements in agriculture could have benefits on the livelihoods of the poorest small holder farmers.
A primer explaining the inclusive business models companies can use to work towards Goal 1, Goal 8 and Goal 10
This report highlights the benefits for businesses of implementing adaptation activities that contribute to increasing societal resilience and attaining Goal 15.
Elsevier,

Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Volume 103, Issue 2, February 2014, Pages 137–149

Diabetes is a serious and increasing global health burden and estimates of prevalence are essential for appropriate allocation of resources and monitoring of trends. The SDG 3.4 target for 2030 is to reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being. This paper concludes that low and middle income countries will experience the greatest increase of diabetes over the next 22 years, highlighting inequalities in healthcare and nutritition.
Research since 2000 has clearly shown the links between transport disadvantage, poverty, and economic and social exclusion. This paper reflects on the extent to which a social exclusion approach to research on transport disadvantage has been successful in opening up new avenues of research enquiry and/or identifying new theoretical perspectives and/or methodological approaches. It aligns with and shows the connections between SDGs 1, 10 and 11.

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