Science

This article highlights the winning proposals of the first edition of the Elsevier Foundation Green & Sustainable Chemistry Challenge. The winning proposals were chosen for their innovative green chemistry aspects and their large positive impact on the environment, contributing to SDGs 6, 12 and 15.
Diversity of gender and race within senior management roles leads to better thinking and decisionmaking
More women are entering the oil and gas and petrochemical sectors – but there’s still a way to go. It’s all part of a wider drive to increase diversity in the workforce. This is important for advancing SDG 5.1 to end all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere and SDG 5.5 to ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life.
Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes.
The Climate Change supplement to the 'Sustainability Science in a Global Landscape' report provides analysis of the top trends in a shifting research landscape in relation to climate change. Understanding the sustainability research environment is critical to advancing SDG 13.2 to integrate climate change measures into national policies, strategies and planning.
Watch a video providing expert opinion about this report, conducted by Elsevier in collaboration with SciDev.net, which contributes to the understanding of sustainability science as a research field and the dialogue between science and society in sustainable development. The report is relevant to all 17 SDGs as it underlines the inter-disciplinary nature of sustainability science and the impact that has on the success of the SDGs. The report helps to advance SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 10 Reduced inequalities.
This Elsevier report provides evidence and analysis on potential gender gaps in science research in Germany by linking data from Scopus to data from a large online social networking service. This type of analysis is vital for advancing SDG 5.2 to end all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
This chapter addresses SDGs 3 and 10 by providing a review of intellectual disabilities, health disparities and health inequality in both children and adults from wide-ranging perspectives including genetics, psychology, education, and other health and behavioral sciences.
This report, conducted by Elsevier in collaboration with SciDev.net, contributes to the understanding of sustainability science as a research field and the dialogue between science and society in sustainable development. The report is relevant to all 17 SDGs as it underlines the inter-disciplinary nature of sustainability science and the impact that has on the success of the SDGs. The report helps to advance SDG 4 Quality education and SDG 10 Reduced inequalities.
Elsevier, Social Science and Medicine, Volume 128, March 01, 2015
There is a very large literature examining income inequality in relation to health. Early reviews came to different interpretations of the evidence, though a large majority of studies reported that health tended to be worse in more unequal societies. More recent studies, not included in those reviews, provide substantial new evidence. Our purpose in this paper is to assess whether or not wider income differences play a causal role leading to worse health.
Provision of clean water is one of the most important issues worldwide because of continuing economic development and the steady increase in the global population. However, clean water resources are decreasing everyday, because of contamination with various pollutants including organic chemicals. Pharmaceutical and personal care products, herbicides/pesticides, dyes, phenolics, and aromatics (from sources such as spilled oil) are typical organics that should be removed from water.

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