Articles

Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 62, Issue 2, 30 January 2017, Pages 83-91

Traditional nutrient recycling systems in China have been recognized as a good model for long-term sustainability. Nevertheless, the traditional philosophy has not been well inherited in modern society, and the consequences of environmental degradation from the changed nutrient management systems have not been well recognized by the public. If the additional nutrient sources in future urbanization cannot be well recycled, people will face more challenging environmental problems. The analysis of the environmental and economic costs from wastewater treatment systems indicates that the road for nutrient management after the 1980s was not the right choice. China should re-evaluate the value of the traditional philosophy and develop new technologies to meet modern socioeconomic requirements. These insights support many of the targets to advance SDG 11 Sustainable cities and communities.
Elsevier,

Science Bulletin, Volume 61, Issue 23, December 2016, Pages 1833-1838

Future climate change is usually projected by coupled earth system models under specific emission scenarios designed by integrated assessment models (IAMs): this offline approach means there is no interaction between the coupled earth system models and the IAMs. This paper introduces a new method to design possible future emission scenarios and corresponding climate change, in which a simple economic and climate damage component is added to the coupled earth system model of Beijing Normal University (BNU-ESMs. Measuring future climate change is critical for reporting on progress on SDG 13 Climate action.
Elsevier,

Kidney International Supplements, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2017, Pages 71-87

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a global public health concern and an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. In support of SDG 3, this review expands on the recently published International Society of Nephrology (ISN) CKD roadmap, which discusses the globally relevant major traditional and nontraditional CKD risk factors, highlights gaps in knowledge, and recommends strategies to close these gaps and enhance CKD prevention.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 7, October 2017, Pages 13-17

Over the last decades, considerable attention has been directed towards the use of water as a medium in organic synthesis for sustainability, non-toxicity and safety reasons. In support of SDG 12, the paper presents the most recent advances in applications of alternative medium to replace polar aprotic solvents such as dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Focus is made on the use of nonionic designer surfactant (e.g. TPGS-750-M) in water instead of traditional organic solvents.
Elsevier,

The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology (October 2017)

Addressing hunger and malnutrition (goal 2) is key to advancing goal 3. This review and meta-analysis provides national, regional, and global estimates of lactose malabsorption, which can guide identification of likely causes of gastrointestinal symptoms and their optimal management, and also guide policy—eg, when choosing food for provision during famine outbreaks.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Cities and Society, Volume 34, 2017, Pages 69-78

Low carbon investments in urban areas offer additional benefits (health and jobs). This article examines the co-benefits of low carbon investments in three 3 projects in different cities, addressing SDG 11 (sustainable cities and communities) and SDG 13 (climate action).
Elsevier,

Elsevier, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, October 2017

Reducing premature mortality from non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, is a target under goal 3 (good health and wellbeing). This article investigates the relationship between diet and the common risk factors for heart disease.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 7, October 2017, Pages 23-30

Enzymes are used in biocatalytic processes for the efficient and sustainable production of pharmaceuticals, fragrances, fine chemicals, and other products. Most bioprocesses exploit chemistry found in nature, but we are now entering a realm of biocatalysis that goes well beyond. Enzymes have been engineered to catalyze reactions previously only accessible with synthetic catalysts. Because they can be tuned by directed evolution, many of these new biocatalysts have been shown to perform abiological reactions with high activity and selectivity. We discuss recent examples, showcase catalyst improvements achieved using directed evolution, and comment on some current and future implications of non-natural enzyme evolution for sustainable chemical synthesis.
Elsevier,

Marine Pollution Bulletin, Volume 123, Issues 1–2, 15 October 2017, Pages 28-33

SDG14 Life Below Water aims to lay the foundation for the integrated and sustainable management of the oceans. However, any environmental management has to be based around targets which are SMART – specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bounded. The discussion here shows that many of the targets adopted for SDG14, and especially a detailed analysis of Target 1, are aspirational rather than fully quantified.
Elsevier,

Ecosystem Services, Volume 27, Part B, October 2017, Pages 253-260

Ecological infrastructure (EI) refers to ecosystems that deliver services to society, functioning as a nature-based equivalent of, or complement to, built infrastructure. EI is critical for socio-economic development, supporting a suite of development imperatives at local, national and international scales. This paper presents the myriad of ways that EI supports sustainable development, using South Africa and the South African National Development Plan as a case study, linking to the Sustainable Development Goals on a global level. We show the need for EI across numerous development and sustainability issues, including food security, water provision, and poverty alleviation contributing to several SDGs not least, goals 1, 11 and 17.

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