Thirty years of public health research have demonstrated that improved indoor environmental quality is associated with better health outcomes. Recent research has demonstrated an impact of the indoor environment on cognitive function. In high-performing buildings additional benefits to health and productivity may be obtained through green certification. This relates to SDGs 3, 9 and 11.
This paper is about the importance educating midwives on malaria. Malaria complicates 80% of pregnancies in Uganda, therefore equipping midwives with the necessary information to deliver malaria-related in-service education to pregnant women could reduce infant and maternal mortality in Uganda. This relates to SDG 3 and in-particular the targets 3.1 concerned with maternal mortality and 3.3 concerned with ending the epidemic of malaria.
This paper examines the use of contraceptives and the social influence surrounding their use in Sub-Saharan Africa. Research shows that women wish to control birth numbers but few use contraception, thus increasing population and adding pressure on scarce resources, as well as contributing to increased mortality and general ill-health. This paper addresses SDG 3 (Good health and well-being) as well as SDG 5 (Gender equality).
Soil-transmitted helminth infection is the most common parasitic human disease, affecting an estimated 1·45 billion individuals worldwide. School-age children are at especially high risk of morbidity from infection and as a result, deworming campaigns are often targeted to this age group. This study is the first to synthesise existing research reporting the effect of either targeted or mass distribution of deworming programmes, and suggests that expanding campaigns community-wide in endemic areas could reduce the incidence of these infections in school-age children.
The International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) and Childhood Cancer International (CCI) held a symposium at the 48th SIOP Congress in Dublin, Ireland, on Oct 19, 2016, entitled “Essential medicines for children with cancer: dynamics and challenges”. This joint position statement summarises the symposium's key consensus findings to galvanise the international oncology community to achieve sustained improvements in access to medicines for children with cancer, regardless of disease or geography supporting tagerts 3.2 and 3.4.
In South Africa the population over the age of 60 is increasing and predicted to reach 5.5 million by 2025 and yet the knowledge and awareness of dementia is low. This study describes an innovative programme for caring for older people and people affected by dementia in one isolated rural community in South Africa, contributing to SDG 3 to ensure healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages.
Depression accounts for the largest burden of mental illness worldwide, with a global prevalence of 4·7% and an associated cost of US$1·15 trillion. Although psychological treatments are recommended as first-line interventions, most depressed people living in poor countries lack access to such treatments. This trial done in India is the first study to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychological treatment for depression in a lower middle-income country, showing acceptability, feasibility, and cost-effectiveness when delivered by lay health-workers and advancing knowledge on SDG 3.
Elsevier,

International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences, Volume 6, 2017, Pages 8-13

This paper details a Research Summit, which was convened in Nairobi, Kenya and aimed to: identify regional gaps in knowledge and priorities for nursing and midwifery research and mentorship, recommend strategies that address these gaps, develop a mentorship plan with access to a pool of regional and global nurse and midwifery research experts, and disseminate recommended strategies with a mentorship approach to pave the way for sustainability and replication. It helps support both SDG 3 and SDG 4, recognising the importance of quality education to develop and enhance the careers of nurses and midwives.
The cost of the health SGDs
How much will it cost to reach the health-related SDGs in low-income and middle-income countries? This model-based projection analysis funded by the World Health Organization estimates that an extra $274 billion spending on health is needed per year by 2030 to make progress towards the SDG 3 targets—the equivalent of $58 per person. If actually spent, 97 million lives could be saved and life expectancy increased by 3·1–8·4 years.
Kidney diseases (KDs), both acute and chronic, are recognized as major public health issues worldwide and important contributors to the rising burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). More than half of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) do not receive any treatment, especially in the low and low middle income countries (LMICs). Similarly, acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to about 1.7 million preventable deaths every year worldwide. There is a critical requirement for the development of an implementation framework tailored to the local needs of health systems and to optimize the quality of care for patients at risk for developing KD in limited-resource settings. SDG 3.4 specifically addresses reduction of premature mortality from NCDs.

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