Africa

Elsevier,

Elsevier Foundation, June 2017

The Elsevier Foundation partners with the African Journal Partnership Program, pairing African health and medical journals with leading biomedical journals from the US and UK to build editorial skills through journal mentoring and training. Elsevier volunteers can spend up to one month supporting African journals to boost knowledge exchange, in line with SDG 10.
The winners of the 2017 Elsevier Foundation Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge are first-prize winner (at right) Dênis Pires de Lima, PhD, a professor at Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, and runner-up Chioma Blaise Chikere, PhD, a
"The Elsevier Foundation is encouraging innovation and enhancing scientific research through its Green and Sustainable Chemistry Challenge. This open competition aims to encourage green and sustainable chemistry solutions to tackle some of the biggest sustainability challenges, whether in water, energy or sanitation and directly supports SDG 9 target 5 by encouraging innovation, in particular in developing countries. The winner of the 2017 Challenge is developing low-cost and sustainable insecticides with the aim of reducing mosquito-related diseases such as Dengue Fever."
Although it is one of the poorest countries in the world, devastated by the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi and heavily aid-dependent, Rwanda has achieved most of its Millennium Development targets for health. This article discusses how it managed this, when many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa failed to achieve theirs, and assesses the sustainability of its solutions.
This article aims to contribute to current discussions about “making cities inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable” (SDG 11) by linking debates that are currently taking place in separate containers: debates on the “global land rush” and the “new urban agenda”. It highlights some important processes that are overlooked in these debates and advances a new, socially inclusive urbanization agenda that addresses emerging urban land grabs.
Objectives malaria causes complications during 80% of all pregnancies in Uganda. However, only 48% of Ugandan pregnant women took one dose of intermittent preventive therapy while merely 27% took the second dose during 2011. This study investigated midwives’ provision of anti-malaria services in the Buikwe District of Uganda. Design a quantitative exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting prenatal clinics (n=16) in the Buikwe District of Uganda Respondents questionnaires were completed by 40 (out of a population of 45) midwives.
Elsevier,

Agricultural Systems (Second Edition), Agroecology and Rural Innovation for Development, 2017, Pages 33-72

This book chapter addresses goals 11, 15, 12 and 13 by examining the ecological principles that provide a foundation for resilient and sustainable agriculture that supports rural livelihoods.
The Business and Sustainable Development Commission’s Africa Focus Report identifies the major market opportunities Africa, where sustainable business models could open up an economic prize of at least US$1.1 trillion and create over 85 million new jobs by 2030. Partnerships forged by business are integral to the success of all SDGs and in particular SDG 17.
Uncertainties in evaluating bioenergy projects have lead policymakers to adopt a restrictive approach or even refuse to evaluate projects when the available information is limited or a clear perception of its benefits and impact is lacking. Indeed, despite its potential advantages, a bioenergy system poses several conceptual and operational challenges for academic as well as practical scrutiny because the inherent relationship and the intersection of areas related to energy production and agricultural activity requires a deeply integrated assessment.
With Sustainable Development Goal 7, the United Nations has declared its ambition to ensure access to modern energy for all by 2030. Aside from broad appeals to differentiated responsibilities and ‘greener’ technologies, however, the goal leaves significant procedural questions unaddressed. This paper argues that the basic orientation of this approach is problematic, undermining possibilities for progress toward energy justice and equitable development.
Given the challenge of offering a development perspective to a rapidly growing population, it might be tempting for Africa to pursue a strategy of fueling growth with the cheapest source of energy available and take care of the environment later. Such an approach, however, would disregard the social cost of fossil fuels, which the population would have to bear. Using the Sustainable Development Goals as a benchmark for inclusive and sustainable growth we identify the synergy effects provided by renewable energy.

Pages