Multi-stakeholder partnerships

Successful Food-energy-water (FEW) nexus projects will be more likely to succeed if a transdisciplinary approach is used. Ecological modernization (ecological technology) policies and practices, and sustainable supply chains influence the FEW nexus from a commerce and industry perspective. Taking these perspectives and considering their intertwined linkages is important for advancing research and adoption of FEW nexus efforts. This paper provides an overview of these perspectives and interlinkages.
Linking to Goals 2, 6, 15, 17, this toolbox connects your business to the latest tools, guidance, case studies, datasets, and more most relevant to you based on your circumstances and interests.
Linking to Goal 6 and Goal 17, this Guide to Water-Related Collective Action offers good practice to help companies establish enduring relationships with a broad spectrum of stakeholders, leaders, and individuals to advance sustainable water management.

United Nations University, May 2018.

Contributing to SDGs 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and 17 (Partnerships for the Goals), this research seeks to understand if, when and how transitional justice, in combination with other conflict resolution tools, can contribute to transitions away from conflict in settings affected by major jihadist groups.
Next Einstein SDG Resource Centre
Supports Goals 4 and 10. A unique partnership between the Next Einstein Forum (NEF) and Elsevier will see the creation of a new pan-African, peer reviewed, open access publishing journal, dedicated to boosting the global reach and impact of research by Africans.
In this year’s Special Edition of the UN Global Compact-Accenture Strategy CEO Study, the world’s largest program of CEO research on sustainability, we focus our attention on goal 17, transforming partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals. Following a decade of research into the views of business leaders worldwide, we examine the views of UN leaders. As the UN Secretary-General calls for enhanced cooperation between the United Nations and the private sector, we ask agency heads and partnership practitioners across the UN system: what will it take to scale up partnerships to bring about transformational impact on the SDGs?
Elsevier, Food Policy, Volume 75, February 2018
Wasting food is one of the rare problems that affects our ability to achieve economic goals in terms of food security, environmental sustainability, and farm-financial security. Most of the ideas proposed to this point involve either behavioral nudges or administrative regulations that are either too paternalistic or piecemeal to represent viable solutions. In this study, we investigate the potential for commercial peer-to-peer mutualization systems (CPMSs), or sharing-economy firms, to emerge as market platforms for the exchange of surplus food.
The SDGs are all connected. Success in one goal often relies on success in another. The science supporting the SDGs needs to reflect these connections, which is what the Perspectives Project aims to achieve: enabling collaboration between experts from all over the world. The project addresses a core question: how is the SDG agenda influencing scholarly debates in different research areas, and vice-versa? The reviews will cover the breadth of the SDGs and will be published as part of three special issues in three key journals.
Food retailers and manufacturers are increasingly committing to address agricultural sustainability issues in their supply chains. In place of using established eco-certifications, many companies define their own supply chain sustainability standards. Scholars remain divided on whether we should expect such company-led programs to affect change. We use a major food retailer as a critical case to evaluate the effectiveness of a company-led supply chain standard in improving environmental farm management practices.
This report seeks to provide an in-depth review of SDG 6 and includes data on the global baseline status, the current situation and trends at global and regional levels, and what more needs to be done to achieve this goal by 2030. The report is based on the latest data available for the 11 SDG 6 global indicators selected by Member States to track progress towards the eight global targets, plus complementary data and evidence from a wide range of sources.

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