Multi-stakeholder partnerships

Investors, governments, and other stakeholders are increasingly demanding that companies demonstrate sustainable strategies aligned with the SDGs. A credible SDG strategy allows a company to clearly communicate its impact, facilitates easier access to the growing market for SDG financing, and connects investors with a pipeline of potential opportunities to address the SDG investment gap. This guide seeks to support companies looking to integrate the SDGs into their financial strategy and business model, contributing to SDGs 8, 12 and 17.
While the public sector and public finance will be core to the implementation of the SDGs, it is widely acknowledged that the private sector and capital markets must also play a key role. This report furthers SDGs 8, 12 and 17 by seeking to inspire major players in the investment value chain to build a market for mainstream SDG investments, with enough scale, liquidity and diversification to attract large institutional investors and finance a broad set of private- and public-sector activities in support of the SDGs.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International: Synergy, Volume 1, 2019, Pages 185-203

Linked to SDGs 3, 5, 9 and 16, this article discusses how Sexual and Gender Based Violence (SGBV) in Kenya is highly complex requiring a multi-sectoral approach for comprehensive management.
This report provides an assessment of how companies in the UN Global Compact are adopting the Ten Principles and taking action to deliver on the SDGs. It contributes to Goals 10, 12 and 17.
Contributing to SDGs 1 and 8, this report discusses how the adoption of pro-growth policies tends to result in lower levels of poverty, especially through opportunities for job creation. In particular, it calls for policies that promote greater access to credit and the protection of minority investors in order to reduce such levels of poverty. 
This guide explores the role of corporate finance and investments in scaling finance for the SDGs, including how FDI, financial intermediation and public-private partnerships can be a source of finance for less liquid SDG investments that cannot be invested directly by portfolio or institutional investors. This includes providing access to finance in countries with less developed financial markets or for SDG solutions that are too small or illiquid to attract portfolio investors. The report contributes to SDGs 8, 16 and 17.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018, Pages 54-61.

There is a need to broaden the measures used to determine marine management effectiveness, especially in the context of achieving the SDGs. To advance goal 14, this article urges governments to pay more attention to new governance tools, including open innovation, when formulating new policy aimed at building future scenarios of economic resilience involving marine resource use.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018, Pages 48-53.

Furthering goal 11, this paper seeks to demonstrate that while the recentralization of urban governance has some potential to generate more sustainable human settlement patterns, it is less likely to foster sustainable and socially just transitions within cities.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018, Pages 43-47.

The SDGs offer oppotunities for closer environment-poverty integration. However, to be transformative, they need a broadening of measures and indicators. This paper argues that indicators should include constituent roles of environment in wellbeing and poverty, furthering goals 1 and 3.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volume 34, October 2018, Pages 33-42.

This article contributes to goal 15 by arguing that the SDG portfolio can trigger a major step towards more holistic land use perspectives at the agriculture-forestry interface. This, in turn, has the potential to initiate institutional change to enhance dynamic sustainability.

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