Oceans & Seas

Oceans and seas play a vital role in the context of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as they significantly contribute to the Earth's biosphere's health and the global economy. They are critical to sustaining life on earth, acting as a major source of food and oxygen while also serving as natural carbon sinks that mitigate climate change impacts. SDG 14, "Life Below Water," explicitly acknowledges the importance of conservation and the sustainable use of the world's oceans, seas, and marine resources.

Oceans absorb about 30% of carbon dioxide produced by humans, buffering the impacts of global warming. However, this process has implications such as ocean acidification, negatively impacting marine biodiversity and ecosystems. These impacts, coupled with unsustainable fishing practices and pollution, threaten the health of our oceans and seas. SDG 14 sets targets to prevent and reduce marine pollution of all kinds, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems, and regulate harvesting and end overfishing to restore fish stocks to sustainable levels.

Oceans also support economic wellbeing. Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. By protecting oceanic ecosystems, the SDGs also support SDG 1, "No Poverty," and SDG 8, "Decent Work and Economic Growth." Furthermore, the oceanic routes are critical for global trade, supporting SDG 9, "Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure."

Furthermore, by implementing strategies for cleaner and more sustainable use of oceans and seas, it can also contribute to SDG 13, "Climate Action." For instance, developing and implementing new technologies to harness energy from waves and tides can promote renewable energy usage and reduce reliance on fossil fuels, aligning with SDG 7, "Affordable and Clean Energy."

This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 15: Life on Land by describing the global tectonic processes that form mid-ocean ridges and critical seafloor habitat.
Offers practical insights to guide shipping industry managers to introduce environmentally responsible and sustainable practices.
This article focuses on a key industry in ocean governance - tuna fishery - to examine how companies and governments relationship in international fishery negotiations can influence the governance of tuna fishery industry.
Elsevier,

Trends in Biotechnology, Volume , 2023

This is an Opinion article by two highly accomplished synthetic biologists that explains how synthetic biology tools can benefit oceans.
As growing coastal societies and projected high population densities predict a larger demand for marine ecosystem services in the future, jellyfish may affect the fulfillment of such needs, thus becoming prominent players in provisioning, cultural, and supporting services. Hence, our results advocate for their inclusion in multidisciplinary research beyond regional scales and call for investing in this group through systematic surveys.
Elsevier,

Renewable Energy - Volume 2: Wave, Geothermal, and Bioenergy Definitions, Developments, Applications, Case Studies, and Modelling and Simulation, Volume , 1 January 2023

This chapter aligns with SDGs 7 and 11, by describing the role and possibilities of wave energy to help support global (sustainable) energy systems.
Elsevier,

Managing Urban Rivers: from Planning to Practice, Volume , 1 January 2023

This chapter aligns with Goal 6: Clean water and sanitation by reviewing the tools available for the collection of groundwater samples, methods of on-site water-quality analysis
Elsevier,

Transportation Research Procedia, Volume 72, 2023

Advocates and justifies a specific maritime policy that would protect marine biodiversity in the Mediterranean.
Elsevier,

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology -Part A : Molecular and Integrative Physiology, Volume 274, December 2022

This article advances SDG # 15 and SDG # 14 by highlighting the value of the use of haematology in identifying changing patterns of health among seabirds which may serve as an early indicator of breeding failure, overwintering mortality, and population declines.
This paper highlights the alarming rate of which levels of chemicals are being found in seawater.

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