Oceans & Seas

Oceans and seas play a vital role in the context of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as they significantly contribute to the Earth's biosphere's health and the global economy. They are critical to sustaining life on earth, acting as a major source of food and oxygen while also serving as natural carbon sinks that mitigate climate change impacts. SDG 14, "Life Below Water," explicitly acknowledges the importance of conservation and the sustainable use of the world's oceans, seas, and marine resources.

Oceans absorb about 30% of carbon dioxide produced by humans, buffering the impacts of global warming. However, this process has implications such as ocean acidification, negatively impacting marine biodiversity and ecosystems. These impacts, coupled with unsustainable fishing practices and pollution, threaten the health of our oceans and seas. SDG 14 sets targets to prevent and reduce marine pollution of all kinds, sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems, and regulate harvesting and end overfishing to restore fish stocks to sustainable levels.

Oceans also support economic wellbeing. Over three billion people depend on marine and coastal biodiversity for their livelihoods. By protecting oceanic ecosystems, the SDGs also support SDG 1, "No Poverty," and SDG 8, "Decent Work and Economic Growth." Furthermore, the oceanic routes are critical for global trade, supporting SDG 9, "Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure."

Furthermore, by implementing strategies for cleaner and more sustainable use of oceans and seas, it can also contribute to SDG 13, "Climate Action." For instance, developing and implementing new technologies to harness energy from waves and tides can promote renewable energy usage and reduce reliance on fossil fuels, aligning with SDG 7, "Affordable and Clean Energy."

This study systematically evaluates the successful human stewardship in managing marine protected areas to provide useful lessons for future marine conservation actions.

World Water Day 2024: Harnessing Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) for Global Water Sustainability

As we approach World Water Day 2024, it's imperative to delve into the heart of the matter - the critical importance of water and the role of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in addressing the global water crisis. This day, celebrated every 22nd of March, focuses our attention on the vital importance of water and its impact on the environment, health, and livelihoods.

Elsevier,

Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, Volume 565, 2023, 151916

This study provides a better understanding of the burrowing behaviour of the sub-legal size clams discarded on the sediment after being disturbed and contributes important data to improve practices for minimizing mortality of dislodged clams that are discarded on the sediment surface.
We are at a critical crossroads for the future governance of the high seas. We used the Nature Futures Framework to explore desirable futures for the high seas. Creative endeavours of co-production encourage imagination to address challenges. Participatory processes are important tools in the science-policy interface. Stories and art can be powerful ways to overcome barriers.
Selective copepod grazing and water mass origin impacted spring bloom composition. Diatom bloom enhanced zooplankton recruitment and deep carbon export. Spring bloom composition impacted summer plankton community. Mixo- and heterotrophic protists dominated the nutrient-poor summer months. Copepod grazers controlled the summer protist community.
This study proposes a deep learning model based on a convolutional neural network, which can effectively fuse atmospheric information (wind field) and station water level information and can effectively forecast the station water level and also have a good response to the anomalous water level increase brought by storm surge.
This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 3: Good Health and Wellbeing by highlighting some of the many beneficial industrial and pharmaceutical applications of marine microalgae.
Sea urchins are one of the most amenable model systems in developmental biology and they have enabled major discoveries. In this study, the authors investigated how conserved the genomic and regulatory architecture is between P. lividus, other sea urchins, and chordates. By integrating genomic and regulatory datasets, they demonstrated how regulatory changes could be associated with the origin of the novel body plan of urchins and other echinoderms.
The survey presented here was conducted to better understand public perceptions of climate change, human impacts and the value and management of marine and coastal ecosystems.
This chapter aligns with Goal 14: Life Below Water and Goal 6: Clean Water and Sanitation by describing advancements in the use of melt electrospun nanofibers for use in marine oil spill cleanup.

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