Technology

Technology plays a central role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 9 (Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure), SDG 4 (Quality Education), SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), and SDG 13 (Climate Action). The transformative power of technology can accelerate progress towards all the SDGs by driving economic growth, reducing inequalities, enhancing access to basic services, and promoting sustainability.

Under SDG 9, technology, particularly in terms of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), is a key enabler of industrial innovation and infrastructure development. ICT has the potential to drive economic growth by enhancing productivity, creating jobs, and fostering entrepreneurship. Moreover, it can contribute to making industries more sustainable by facilitating the transition towards smart manufacturing and circular economy models.

Regarding SDG 4, technology can greatly enhance access to quality education. Digital technologies, including e-learning platforms, can break down barriers to education, such as geographical distance, socio-economic status, and physical disabilities. They can also enrich the learning process by enabling personalized, student-centered learning experiences.

In the context of SDG 3, technology has a profound impact on health outcomes. Medical technologies, from simple devices like thermometers to complex systems like MRI machines, have revolutionized healthcare delivery. Furthermore, digital health technologies, such as telemedicine and mobile health apps, can enhance access to health services, improve patient outcomes, and reduce healthcare costs.

For SDG 13, technology offers powerful tools for mitigating and adapting to climate change. Renewable energy technologies can help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, while climate information services can enhance resilience to climate impacts. Furthermore, digital technologies can facilitate the monitoring and reporting of climate actions, contributing to greater transparency and accountability.

However, the benefits of technology are not automatic, and there are significant challenges to overcome, including the digital divide, cybersecurity threats, and ethical issues related to privacy and data ownership. Thus, policy interventions and multi-stakeholder partnerships are needed to ensure that technology serves as a catalyst for sustainable development and does not exacerbate inequalities.

Since 2000, mobile phone technologies have been widely adopted in many developing countries. Existing research shows that use of mobile phones has improved smallholder farmers’ market access and income. Beyond income, mobile phones can possibly affect other dimensions of social welfare, such as gender equality and nutrition. Such broader social welfare effects have hardly been analyzed up till now. Here, we address this research gap, using panel data from smallholder farm households in Uganda.
HIV Rapid Test being administered (Equality Michigan viaWikimedia Commons)
Background Multistage, stepwise HIV testing and treatment procedures can result in lost opportunities to provide timely antiretroviral therapy (ART). Incomplete engagement of patients along the care cascade translates into high preventable mortality. We aimed to identify whether a structural intervention to streamline testing and linkage to HIV health care would improve testing completeness, ART initiation, and viral suppression and reduce mortality. Methods We did a cluster-randomised, controlled trial in 12 hospitals in Guangxi, China.
The global electronics industry is one of the largest industrial sectors in the global economy, generating more revenue than any other goods-producing sector. This report examines the supply chain risks of forced labour across the industry, and manufacturing and mining in two key countries: Malaysia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It includes an analysis of top electronics brands. This report highlights the challenges in advancing target SDG 8.7 to take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking.
All-Energy Australia is where the country’s clean energy industry meets over two inspiring days to access the latest, cutting-edge information. All-Energy Australia combines a free-to-attend, business-to-business, world-class multi-stream conference with an unrivaled professional development and networking forum alongside a comprehensive exhibition. Clean energy professionals and end-users benefit from unique access to a showcase of innovations in renewable energy including sustainable transport, solar technology, energy storage, energy efficiency and future grid.
World Smart Energy Week is the world's largest-scale exhibition specialised in renewable energy. Since its launch in 2005, the show serves as the best business platform for those in the energy industry across the globe. This supports SDG 9: to build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.
Screen shots from the LexisNexis Newsdesk® app
The LexisNexis Newsdesk® app featuring human rights is a free app which tracks news about the 17 SDGs and brings relevant stories from across the world in real time to your mobile device. Media monitoring using LexisNexis technology provides insights and news that will inform all those who are working to advance the SDGs. Target SDG 17.16 includes encouraging multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries.
How can innovations in chemistry, energy, and biotechnology jointly be applied in low-resource settings for the benefit of a community? This LabLinks meeting combines the expertise in the applied biosciences of Trends in Biotechnology, Joule’s interest in both scientific and sustainability developments in energy, and Chem’s focus on basic chemical science with relevance to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
This book chapter advances SDG 3, 6, and 12 by demonstrating the major water pollutants of incipient concern, their source, and fate.
Elsevier, Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 12, 1 July 2017
Material and product life cycles are based on complex value chains of technology-specific elements. Resource strategy aspects of essential and strategic raw materials have a direct impact on applications of new functionalized materials or the development of novel products. Thus, an urgent challenge of modern materials science is to obtain information about the supply risk and environmental aspects of resource utilization, especially at an early stage of basic research.

The development of new high-efficiency magnets and/or electric traction motors using a limited amount of critical rare earths or none at all is crucial for the large-scale deployment of electric vehicles (EVs) and related applications, such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and e-bikes. For these applications, we estimated the short-term demand for high-performing NdFeB magnets and their constituent rare earths: neodymium, praseodymium and dysprosium. In 2020, EV, HEV and e-bike applications combined could require double the amount used in 2015.

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