Sustainable transport

Sustainable transport plays a crucial role in realizing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically through SDG 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities), SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being), and SDG 13 (Climate Action). By fostering an inclusive and sustainable transportation system, we can facilitate social and economic development, mitigate environmental damage, and improve the overall quality of life.

In the context of SDG 9, sustainable transport infrastructure fosters economic growth and innovation by enabling the movement of goods and services, promoting regional integration, and enhancing access to markets. It also drives industrial sustainability by fostering energy-efficient modes of transport and facilitating the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Under SDG 11, sustainable transport is key to creating sustainable cities and communities. It enhances urban mobility, reduces congestion, and mitigates air pollution, thereby improving the quality of life in urban areas. Public transportation, cycling, and walking, as components of sustainable transport, also promote social inclusion by ensuring everyone, including the poor, the disabled, and the elderly, can access opportunities and services.

For SDG 3, sustainable transport can improve public health. Reducing the reliance on private vehicles decreases air and noise pollution, mitigating respiratory diseases, and reducing stress levels. Furthermore, encouraging active transport modes, such as walking and cycling, can combat sedentary lifestyles and associated health issues, such as obesity and heart diseases.

In relation to SDG 13, sustainable transport plays a vital role in combating climate change. The transportation sector is one of the major contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, thus, shifting towards sustainable transport, such as electric vehicles or public transport, can significantly reduce carbon emissions and help mitigate the effects of climate change.

Despite its benefits, achieving sustainable transport requires addressing multiple challenges, such as the high upfront costs of sustainable transport infrastructure, the lack of institutional capacity, and resistance from vested interests. Policies and strategies should be implemented to encourage the use of sustainable transport and ensure its affordability and accessibility to all members of society.

Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is a recent concept that is gaining momentum in both the scientific world and the private sector. First studies and field trials – essentially conducted in developed countries – suggest that MaaS can influence people's mobility behavior and create more efficient and sustainable transport systems for the future. We intend to contribute to the existing knowledge about MaaS by extending the scope to the context of developing countries where MaaS could be a potential strategy to address existing transport problems.
This article examines the trade-offs between industrial development that benefits indigenous peoples economically and the environmental and other harms that result.
Recommends ways to make daily travel safer for women.
Elsevier,

Machinery and Energy Systems for the Hydrogen Economy, Volume , 1 January 2022

This chapter advances the UN SDG goals 7, 11, and 12 by reviewing the fundamentals of hydrogen, it's properties, and its use as a sustainable fuel source
Elsevier,

Machinery and Energy Systems for the Hydrogen Economy, Volume , 1 January 2022

This chapter advances the UN SDG goals 7, 11, and 12 by reviewing the current state of hydrogen production and markets to determine the most economically viable routes towards introducing clean hydrogen fuel
As evidence of the health impacts of transportation investments has grown, planners have increasingly used health impact assessments (HIAs) to evaluate transportation plans, projects, and policies. Most HIAs to date, however, have been limited in their ability to quantify health impacts due to a lack of validated methods and tools, scarcity of disaggregate and locally-relevant data, and cost. This paper presents the development and application of a quantitative HIA tool designed to address these and other common limitations of existing HIAs.
Elsevier,

Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, Volume 102, January 2022

This paper cautions that the adoption of electric vehicles with the aim of reducing greenhouse gas emissions must balance that beneficial effect against increased water consumption. It recommends battery electric vehicles charged by solar energy as the best solution.
Elsevier, Transportation Research Procedia, Volume 60, 2022
The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated communities throughout the world. However, the negative impacts of another pandemic, affecting cities worldwide, arguably rival those of COVID. This destructive global health problem, which we have largely ignored, has been described as the “hurry virus” – the culture of speed that dominates modern lives and cities, causing us to constantly strive to ‘go faster’. This hurry virus has comprehensively infected our city transport systems from the early 20th century.
Elsevier,

Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, Volume 102, January 2022

Assesses road markings as a source of microplastic pollution
Bangladesh is one of the world's strongest emerging economies. This nation is working on improving women's empowerment, with more women entering meaningful employment, and socio-cultural constraints on women's mobility gradually decreasing over time. However, for women in Bangladesh, travel constraints are currently more significant than cultural constraints. Therefore, to sustain the nation's economic growth, challenges to women's mobility must be resolved by developing a gender-inclusive transport system. To achieve this, proper transport planning is necessary.

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