International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women 2020

Elsevier, 23rd November 2020

Violence against women and girls is one of the most widespread violations of human rights. 

Global estimates published by WHO indicate that about 1 in 3 (35%) of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. Most of this violence is intimate partner violence. Worldwide, almost one third (30%) of women who have been in a relationship have experienced physical and/or sexual violence by their intimate partner and as many as 38% of all murders of women are committed by intimate partners. Yet to date, only two out of three countries have outlawed domestic violence, while 37 countries worldwide still exempt rape perpetrators from prosecution if they are married to or eventually marry the victim. Furthermore, 49 countries currently have no laws protecting women from domestic violence.

Women's rights activists have observed November 25th as a day against gender-based violence since 1981. This date was selected to honour the Mirabal sisters, three political activists from the Dominican Republic who were brutally murdered in 1960 by order of the country’s ruler, Rafael Trujillo (1930-1961). November 25th also marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence which end on December 10th, Human Rights Day. This annual campaign is used by individuals and organisations around the world to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls.

To mark this event, Elsevier presents a curated, open access collection of 52 journal articles and book chapters to highlight the urgent need to end violence against women and girls.

 

 

 

Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 396, Issue 10245, 18–24 July 2020, Pages 148-150

This article addresses SDG 5 by highlighting the need to tackle gender-based violence, which disproportionately affects women, through comprehensive sexuality education, which is described here as medically accurate, culturally and developmentally relevant information on topics ranging from gender identity, sexual behaviours, and human development to communication skills, empathy, and mutual respect.
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 385, Issue 9977, 18–24 April 2015, Pages 1555-1566

This paper is part of a Lancet Series on violence against women and girls, and addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by reviewing the evidence base for a broad range of interventions aimed at reducing various forms of gender-based violence, from intimate partner violence and sexual assault to female genital mutilation and child marriage. The paper highlights the need for greater investment into violence prevention research and evaluation of programmes focusing on low-income and middle-income countries, as the majority of high-quality evidence is skewed towards high-income countries.
Elsevier,

The Lancet, Volume 385, Issue 9977, 18–24 April 2015, Pages 1567-1579

This paper is part of a Lancet Series on violence against women and girls and addresses SDGs 3 and 5 by highlighting the crucial role that health systems must play in reducing, preventing, and eliminating all forms of violence against women, as part of a multisectoral response comprising health-care providers, health policy makers and health programme planners, clinicians, and public health officials.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International, Volume 315, October 2020, 11043

Contributing to SDGs 5, 9 and 16, this article explores a new ecological working framework built as a multilevel platform useful for understanding and preventing the victimisation of women by drug-facilitated sexual assault.
Elsevier,

Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Volume 75, October 2020, 102035

Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, this paper discusses dowry homicides involving fire.
Elsevier,

Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Volume 72, May 2020, 101959

Whereas numerous studies have documented the multiple forms of physical, sexual, and psychological violence experienced by women, a thorough characterization of the abuses experienced by asylum-seeking women in the United States has not yet been undertaken. Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, the authors' analysis of the affidavits for 85 cisgender, female asylum seekers who applied for forensic medical evaluations through a student-run asylum clinic, reveals a life-long pattern of multiple types of VAW inflicted by multiple perpetrators.
Elsevier,

Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Volume 74, August 2020, 102020

Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, this article reviews the literature on gender-based violence and the drugs used to facilitate sexual assault, addressing their mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics, as well as drug detection times in human body and types of forensic identification.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International, Volume 315, October 2020, 110460

In this article, a multifocal analytical strategy based on an intersectional gender-sensitive approach was used to analyse the evidence coming from both forensic case studies and contextual studies about sexual interrelation and drug use. The paper contributes to SDGs 5, 9, and 16.
Elsevier,

Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine, Volume 74, August 2020, 102029

Working in a SARC is stressful and emotionally difficult work. Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, this study provides valuable insights about the individual and environmental factors SARC staff believe are required to have a happy and healthy workforce delivering a gold standard of care to victim-survivors of sexual violence.
Elsevier,

Forensic Science International, Volume 314, September 2020, 110387

Contributing to SDGs 5 and 16, this study reviewed forensic records of sexual assault examinations carried out in different Italian health facilities and correlated these findings with the results of the forensic DNA analyses.