Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 13, 2017, Pages 18-23

In science and engineering, sustainable nanotechnology is successful in giving solutions for the challenges in various sectors such as medicine, catalysis, industrial and agricultural activities.Due to the growing demand of nanoparticles, it is essential to build up synthetic methods which are profitable, environmentally sustainable and which can substitute with effective and competent technology to synthesis environmentally benign nanoparticles (NPs). Nanomaterials are “deliberately engineered” to direct the enhancement of special properties at the nanoscale. Nanoparticles have been known to be used for abundant physical, biological, and pharmaceutical applications. Nano-silver is the most studied and utilized nanoparticle. This review presents various synthesis methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPAgNPs) and their application in different sectors.
This papers examines sustainable tourism in a United Nations biosphere reserve, advancing the knowledge on SDG 12 target B. It uses critical discourse analysis to understand active stakeholder perspectives and shows that understanding power and ideology is fundamental to sustainable tourism. This paper adds to the literature on stakeholder analysis in tourism specifically and also has wider implications for sustainable development more generally.
This overview provides guidance on the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility as understood under UK law, including the institutional framework for sustainable development. This guidance is relevant to all SDGs and in particular to SDGs 9, 11, and 12.
This Practice Note from LexisPSL considers a number of interesting developments in EU environmental law and policy as it relates to energy efficiency, waste, environmental reporting and chemicals. It also serves to highlight a number of deadlines for relevant implementation and reforms as they relate to companies. These measures will help to advance SDG 7 Energy, SDG 11 Sustainable cities and communities and SDG 12 Sustainable consumption and production.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 12, 2017, Pages 1-8

This article examines the supply risk and environmental aspects of resource utilization. The whole of raw materials goes hand in hand with significant supply risks and environmental impacts. This article therefore contributes to goal 12 (sustainable consumption and production) and goal 9 (industry, innovation and infrastructure).
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 12, July 2017, Pages 1-8

Advancing goals 9 and 12, this paper describes a guideline for material scientists to implement resource strategy considerations in basic research of the development of functional materials. Such considerations will, in turn, help to identify promising sustainable materials, improving the resource efficiency to an enhanced sustainable circular economy.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Volumes 26–27, June 2017, Pages 77-83

Spatial distribution of deforestation observed in 1988–2004 and 2005–2014, including the main territorial units (agrarian settlements) created prior to 2004 and subsequently, along with key transportation infrastructure (paved roads and ports).
In the Brazilian Amazon, environmental considerations have not been adequately incorporated into long-term land use planning and this failure has partly been due to the complexities of the country’s existing inter-sectorial institutional arrangements. The authors point out the major challenges for the balance between of use of natural resources under a capital-driven agenda and the needs and aspirations of large and widely distributed populations throughout the Amazon region, which could have an important role in sustainability. This article demonstrates the multidiscilpinary nature of the SDGs by exploring the interconnectedness of economic development and environmental concerns.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Travel Market, Responsible Tourism Blog, June 2017

june-sdg-session-2016-hotels-sdgs-and-transparent-reporting
At the heart of Responsible Tourism are commitments to transparency and accountability. It is a process of addressing the sustainability issues which arise in a particular place and which the business can do something about, materiality matters. But it is not enough to focus only on the process, it is important to report the achievement. This blog explores reporting frameworks, rating initiatives, certification, recognition and showcases best practice.
Many countries are experiencing economic benefit from a surge in tourism, but once pristine landscapes are changing and local communities rarely benefit from the tourism, and instead run the risk of losing their livelihoods. Researchers in Thailand are investigating “creative tourism” – creative, sustainable approaches to tourism, that enable producers and consumers to relate and get value from their connections. This supports the tourism elements of SDGs 8, 12 and 14.
John Dale left and Derek Burgoyne
Finishing 3,000 dairy-bred beef cattle on waste food while producing green energy and fertiliser as by-products is the sustainable model for one Cambridgeshire farmer and his business partner. This approach helps meet the criteria for SDG 7 of access for all to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy and SDG 12 which promotes responsible consumption and production.

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