One of the most important consequences of climate change could be its effects on agriculture and subsequent global food availability. This modelling study is the first quantitative analysis of the global health implications of dietary and weight changes in view of climate change and agricultural production. It estimates the excess mortality attributable to agriculturally mediated changes by cause of death for 155 world regions in the year 2050. Authors warn that climate change mitigation will be key to preventing climate-related deaths through food insecurity and thereby demonstrating the linkages between SDG 3 and SDG 13.
How are sustainability transitions effectively implemented across borders? This case study of the coffee sector shows the impact of adopting ‘sustainability standards’ and how a ‘modular governance architecture’ in a transnational setting has helped different actors turn sustainability from an ambiguous concept into a concrete set of semi-independent practices. Modular processes like these are able to play an important role in reaching SDG 17 to strengthen the means of implementation.
This brief article discusses why food procurement—the purchase, preparation, and serving of food in public institutions—is a promising strategy to improve the diet and nutritional health of vulnerable populations. With mounting evidence in high-income countries of the benefits of healthy-food procurement in tackling undernourishment, overnourishment, and chronic diseases associated with the latter such as type 2 diabetes, the challenge now is to translate the lessons learned to middle-income and low-income countries, thereby supporting the goals of SDGs 2, 3, and 12.
Elsevier,

Energy and Buildings, Volume 116, 15 March 2016, Pages 703-708

The smart grid's components
Target 11.6 aims to reduce the environmental impact of cities. Technological advances in electric power grid infrastructure, the smart grid, means a greener, more efficient and more adaptable grid. The relationship with the building and the community is explored in this paper to provide a contemporary look at the current state of the art in the potential of buildings and communities to be integrated in smart grids as well as to discuss the still-open research issues in this field.
Elsevier,

Building and Environment, Volume 97, 15 February 2016, Pages 196-202

Heat map of simulated annual heating demand for South Boston using UMI (a) and daily gas and electricity demand profiles for the highlighted building in South Boston (b).
Targets to reduce GHG emissions in cities require significant political willpower. Transportation and industrial activity have varying contributing factors to GHG in cities, while emissions from buildings is always a key contributor. Understanding building emissions is important in achieving SDG 11 and SDG 13. This article reviews both individual building energy models and regional and country-level building stock models as a way of analysing the energy performance of neighbourhoods.
Key strategies to low energy buildings
The behaviour of a building's occupant has a significant impact on the energy consumption of that building. Behaviour patterns of building occupants are uncertain but social scientists have been studying behaviour patterns for decades. Drawing on this research, this paper explores advances and obstacles in modelling occupant behaviour and the impact this can have on measuring energy consumption. Target 11.6 is concerned with reducing the adverse impacts of cities, therefore understanding and being able to predict occupant behaviour will play an important role in achieving this target.
The internal combustion engine does not efficiently convert chemical energy into mechanical energy and most of the energy is lost as heat. This paper discusses promising technologies for passive waste heat recovery system, addressing SDGs 9,12 and 13.
Recent research on CO2 capture is focusing on the optimization of CO2 absorption using amines (mainly monoethanolamine—MEA) in order to minimize the energy consumption of this very energy-intensive process and improve the absorption efficiency. This paper provides an overview of the main implications of using MEA for CO2 capture together with the latest advances in research to improve the conventional absorption process. The use of other solvents and/or technology, as well as their advantages and disadvantages will also be briefly provided. This is relevant for SDGs 9,12 and 13.
Elsevier,

Sustainable Materials and Technologies, Volume 9, 2016, Pages 10-40

The aim of the study was to revise the current literature concerning the application of low-cost adsorbents for wastewater treatment highlighting, systematically, both adsorbents characteristics and adsorption capacities. This is particularly relevant to address SDG 6 - Clean water and sanitation.
Reed Exhibitions,

World Efficiency Solutions - La Galerie des Solutions, 9 December 2015

The Business Case for Carbon Neutral Cities session was hosted by UNEP and Sustainable Energy for All in collaboration with the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Swedish Trade and Invest Council and Empower, the largest district cooling operator in the world. Held at La Galerie des Solutions (by World Efficiency Solutions), an exhibition of climate solutions, that took place during the COP21, in immediate proximity to the negotiations zone.

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