Green waste left over from vegetable harvesting provides feed for sheep and is then returned to the soil as manure
Livestock has disappeared from swathes of England in the past 50 years as many growers became increasingly specialised. However as our soils increasingly suffer leaching, erosion and compaction from ever-heavier modern machinery, more and more arable farmers are reaping the benefits of bringing sheep and cattle back on to the land. Such measures help support SDG 12 Responsible Consumption and Production.
Maize growing under plastic

Critics claim that maize can cause unwanted environmental impacts. But supporters of the crop are able to show how by use of cover crops it can be grown responsibly, reducing or eliminating, for example, nutrient leaching and soil erosion. In south-west England, a Wessex Water project is using cover crops to protect and improve drinking water quality by working with growers whose farms surround boreholes and reservoirs that supply water for human consumption. Steps like this can contribute to SDG 6 to ensure sustainable management of water and SDG 12 to ensure sustainable production.

Elsevier,

Materials Today, Volume 20, Issue 2, 2017, Pages 67-73

In 2013 alone nearly 50 million tons of e-waste was generated worldwide. The United Nations’ STEP initiative has reported that e-waste is expected to grow by 33% over the next 4 years and by 2030 obsolete computer waste will reach 1,000 million tons. This electronic waste often contain toxic substances and nearly 80–85% of electronic products are directly disposed of in landfills or incinerators. The researchers suggest a new technique where circuit boards from electronics can be crushed into nanodust by a cryo-mill. The dust can then be easily separated into its component elements for recycling. The researchers intend it to replace the current process of e-waste into landfills and advances SDG 12.
This is a timely article with potential to tackle multiple fronts of sustainable development with regards to agricultural intensification and green revolution which are currently taking precedence in most developing countries as a means of boosting productivity and ensuring food security. Given the high dependence of the modern global food production system on the continuous supply of commercial phosphorus (P) fertilizers, this study presents a detailed, methodical, and up to date assessment of the key sustainability challenges for the global P resource, and highlights their implications for global food security. This article addresses SDG 2; SDG 12; SDG 14 and SDG 15.
Recycling and reuse are important elements to a sustainable consumption and production strategy. Contributing to goal 12, this article specifically maps the processes used by three recyclers - two in Brazil and one in Switzerland - in their adoption of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment reverse logistics.
This paper reviews the EU Circular Economy package and finds it will require stronger Life Cycle Thinking in product design as the concept is being transformed into legal requirements. It is concluded that suitable standards needs to be developed for different product categories in order to define how to measure compliance with the requirements. The development of a more circular economy supports SDG 12.
Elsevier,

Procedia Manufacturing, Volume 8, 2017, Pages 377-384

This paper argues that product stewardship strategies that integrate environmental information along the value chain help enable the transition to a more circular economy. Examples from automotive, ship and aircraft industries are presented, analyzed and discussed. This article explores how the development of a more circular economy supports several of the SDGs, including SDGs 8, 9 and 12 by examining the opportunities sustainable manufacturing offer.
For many years, the negative environmental impact of plastic mass production was either ignored or underestimated. Fortunately, in the last two decades, strategies for the synthesis and degradation of plastics have been re-evaluated and have led to major advances in the development of (bio-) degradable and recyclable plastics. In her Catalysis article, Dr. García reiterates the environmental issues caused by plastics and gives a scholarly overview of both general and plastic-specific strategies for recycling. She concludes this piece by providing a perspective on the most promising options for making plastics more sustainable and a force for good rather than a source of pollution, supporting SDG 12. This article has triggered three reactions.
Elsevier,

Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, Volume 20, 2016, Pages 402-406

Aquaponics is an innovative smart and sustainable production system for integrating aquaculture with hydroponic vegetable crops, that can play a crucial role in the future of environmental and socio-economic sustainability in smart cities. Aquaponics can play a key role enabling local production with short supply chains in the cities. This contributes to sustainable production addressed in SDG 12 as well as the connection to SDG 2.
Reed Exhibitions,

WTM Responsible Tourism 2016, 8 November 2016

2017 is the UN’s International Year of Sustainable Development through Tourism, the spotlight is going to be shone on the industry’s contribution to sustainable development in destinations. Businesses in the sector, in originating markets and destinations, often talk about the contribution that the industry makes to development in destinations. But when the spotlight is shone what evidence will we have to share with the UN and other sectors? How convincing is our case? What evidence can we provide that out contribution is real and significant?

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