International Women's Day 2022

Imagine a gender equal world.

A world free of bias, stereotypes, and discrimination.

A world that is diverse, equitable, and inclusive.

A world where difference is valued and celebrated.

Together we can forge women's equality.

Collectively we can all #BreakTheBias.

Elsevier, Chest, Volume 160, July 2021
Background: Criteria for low-dose CT scan lung cancer screening vary across guidelines. Knowledge of the eligible pool across demographic groups can enable policy and programmatic decision-making, particularly for disproportionately affected populations. Research Question: What are the eligibility rates for low-dose CT scan screening according to sex and race or ethnicity and how do these rates relate to corresponding lung cancer incidence rates?
Elsevier, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, Volume 91, February 2022
Double standards are widespread throughout biomedicine, especially in research on reproductive health. One of the clearest cases of double standards involves the feminine gendering of reproductive responsibility for contraception and the continued lack of highly effective, reversible methods for cisgender men. While the biomedical establishment accepts diversity and inclusion as important social values for clinical trials, their continued use of inequitable standards undermines their ability to challenge unfair social hierarchies by developing male contraception.
Elsevier,

Blood Advances, Volume 4, Issue 4, February 2020, Pages 755-761

Research looking into the disparities between male and female researchers in hematology
Elsevier, Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Volume 156, February 2022
Much research has been devoted to assessing the effect of commute duration on the subjective well-being of people, but as of yet, the respective body or research has been inconclusive as to whether there is indeed a (large) negative effect or not. To control the spread of COVID-19 governments around the world have taken unprecedented measures to control the outbreak of the Corona-virus. Forcing or strongly advising people to work from home (i.e. at least those who can) is often one of these.
Elsevier, Women's Studies International Forum, Volume 90, 1 January 2022
Featuring original data, this article examines an elaborate network of gendered patterns in the faculty labor pool for the twenty-two English doctoral programs in Canada. Although the gendered distributions seem to approach numerical parity, the more nuanced the analyses, the less equitable these distributions appear. When juxtaposed with Statistics Canada data on English doctoral recipients, such patterns betray unsettling structural inequities for women scholars.
Elsevier, Cities, Volume 108, January 2021
Cities have a significant influence on people's mental and physical health. City planning has the potential to change behaviors and incentivize a healthier lifestyle through the provision of public goods and urban infrastructure. The bulk of the evidence correlating city configuration and population health comes mostly from cities in the global north, with little evidence from cities in developing countries. This analysis seeks to contribute to bridging this evidence gap.
Elsevier, Public Health in Practice, Volume 2, November 2021
Underneath the façade of supposedly bubbly girls, living daily lives in many parts of Nigeria lies the problem of lack of access to proper menstrual hygiene management tools or kits. From schools to business places, religious organizations amongst others, a hive of women and girls face the harsh reality of inability to manage their periods due to poor access to water, sanitation, and hygiene facilities, common in many low- and middle-income countries of which Nigeria sits top.
Elsevier, REACH, Volume 23-24, 1 September 2021
Management of menstruation, pregnancy prevention, and mitigation of gynecologic-related pathology in the space environment with or without the use of hormonal modalities requires thorough counseling and complex decision-making.
Elsevier, Building and Environment, Volume 206, December 2021
Gender differences in the assessment of thermal comfort and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the Gulf Cooperation Countries (GCC) have not previously been investigated, despite the prevalence of the overcooling of indoor spaces. This study investigated the effect of sex, age and body mass index on subjective thermal comfort perceptions, comfort temperature and IEQ satisfaction in offices using our thermal comfort surveys in Qatar, India, and Japan. Data from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) databases were used for comparison.

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