International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 2022

March 21st is acknowledged and celebrated worldwide as the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It aims to encourage society to disown and disregard racial discrimination. The UN resolution (A/RES/2142 (XXI)) that was adopted on 26 October 1966, declares that any kind of racial discrimination is condemnable and the global community is determined to eliminate racial discrimination from its roots wherever it exists in the world. The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on the day the police in Sharpeville, South Africa, opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration against apartheid "pass laws" in 1960.

RELX,

21st March 2022

For International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 2022, Márcia Balisciano, Global Head of Corporate Responsibility at RELX speaks to Jean Chawapiwa and Sara Bodison about the importance of developing diverse supply chains.
Elsevier, Nurse Education Today, Volume 110, March 2022
Objectives: To synthesize literature about teaching social justice to nursing students and identify approaches for effective teaching of social justice issues in nursing education. Design: An integrative review. Data sources: Literature was searched in CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, and OVID databases. In total, 32 articles were assessed for full-text eligibility, and 18 articles published from January 2011 until August 2021 were critically appraised and reviewed. Review methods: Articles were appraised using Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool.
Elsevier, Nurse Education Today, Volume 110, March 2022
Objectives: Health inequities exist for racial groups as a result of political, societal, historical and economic injustices, such as colonisation and racism. To address this, health professions have applied various health education pedagogies to equip learners to contribute better to cultural safety. The aim of this realist review was to provide an overview of cultural safety programs that evaluate transition of learning to practice to generate program theory as to what strategies best translate cultural safety theory to practice for nurses and midwives.
Elsevier, Preventive Medicine, Volume 155, February 2022
Contested racial identity— self-identified race not matching socially-assigned race—may be an indication of experiences with racism. We aimed to understand the relationship between contested racial identity and women's health behaviors, health outcomes, and infant health outcomes. We used 2012–2015 Massachusetts Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data on 5735 women linked with infants' birth certificates.
Elsevier, Translational Oncology, Volume 16, February 2022
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Despite increased screening options and state-of-art treatments offered in clinics, racial differences remain in CRC. African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected by the disease; the incidence and mortality are higher in AAs than Caucasian Americans (CAs). At the time of diagnosis, AAs more often present with advanced stages and aggressive CRCs, primarily accounting for the racial differences in therapeutic outcomes and mortality.
Elsevier, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 79, February 2022
Study objective: This scoping review was conducted to collate and summarize the published research literature addressing sexual and gender minority care in the emergency department (ED). Methods: Using PRISMA-ScR criteria, an electronic search was conducted of CINAHL, Embase, Ovid Medline, and Web of Science for all studies that were published after 1995 involving sexual and gender minorities, throughout all life stages, presenting to an ED. We excluded non-US and Canadian studies and editorials.
Elsevier, European Economic Review, Volume 141, January 2022
We study whether there is a racial bias in ratings of professional football players in Italian newspapers. We find that there is such a bias. Conditional on objective performance indicators black players receive a lower rating than non-black players. This is not a difference across the board but predominantly present at the lower end of the newspaper rating distribution. The best black players are not subject to a racial bias in ratings. We also find that clubs do not have a racial bias in the wages they pay to players.
Elsevier, Clinical Imaging, Volume 81, January 2022
From the more than 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 in the US and the nearly 5 million worldwide, there emerge even more stories than match the statistics when one considers all of the patients' relations. While the numbers are staggering, when we humanize the stories, we are left with even greater devastation, of course. One of the stories among so many that seemed particularly salient and poignant to us was the death of Dr. Susan Moore.
Elsevier, SSM - Population Health, Volume 16, December 2021
Research suggests that racial/ethnic disparities in COVID-19 in the US are largely driven by higher rates of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 among Hispanic/Latino and Black populations. Occupational exposures play a large role in structuring risk of exposure, and essential workers are at elevated risk of COVID-19 infection. At a national-level, workers categorized as “essential” and “high-risk” are disproportionately Hispanic/Latino, but we lack analysis examining local-level racial/ethnic disparities in potential occupational exposures.
Elsevier, Blood Advances, Volume 5, 9 November 2021
Data regarding racial and ethnic enrollment diversity for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) clinical trials in the United States are limited, and little is known about the effect of federal reporting requirements instituted in the late 2000s. We examined demographic data reporting and enrollment diversity for ALL and AML trials in the United States from 2002 to 2017, as well as changes in reporting and diversity after reporting requirements were instituted.

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