International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 2022

March 21st is acknowledged and celebrated worldwide as the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. It aims to encourage society to disown and disregard racial discrimination. The UN resolution (A/RES/2142 (XXI)) that was adopted on 26 October 1966, declares that any kind of racial discrimination is condemnable and the global community is determined to eliminate racial discrimination from its roots wherever it exists in the world. The International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination is observed annually on the day the police in Sharpeville, South Africa, opened fire and killed 69 people at a peaceful demonstration against apartheid "pass laws" in 1960.

Elsevier, The Lancet Digital Health, Volume 3, April 2021
Data-driven digital health technologies have the power to transform health care. If these tools could be sustainably delivered at scale, they might have the potential to provide everyone, everywhere, with equitable access to expert-level care, narrowing the global health and wellbeing gap. Conversely, it is highly possible that these transformative technologies could exacerbate existing health-care inequalities instead.
Elsevier,

Vascular Disease in Women, An Overview of the Literature and Treatment Recommendations, 2021, Pages 307-338

This chapter addresses SDG 3 and SDG 10 by discussing how to mitigate racial disparities in vascular care.
Elsevier,

Advances in Transport Policy and Planning, Volume 8, 2021, Pages 1-31

The chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by exploring the barriers that historically marginalized communities experience as a result of disproportionate policing, safety and security issues, and neighborhood othering and belonging. It concludes by making the case for why transportation planners must consider race and racism explanatory factors in travel and why race-neutral planning processes exacerbate disparities.
Elsevier,

The Inequality of COVID-19, Immediate Health Communication, Governance and Response in Four Indigenous Regions, 2022, Pages 1-29

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by exploring the challenges faced by marginalized Indigenous communities experienced during the pandemic.
Elsevier,

The Inequality of COVID-19, Immediate Health Communication, Governance and Response in Four Indigenous Regions, 2022, Pages 241-258

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by examining the need for equality on the economically and politically marginalized societies.
Elsevier,

Mental and Behavioral Health of Immigrants in the United States, Cultural, Environmental, and Structural Factors, 2020, Pages 157-178

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by exploring how to achieve a culturally competent practice while continuing efforts are needed across various race and ethnicities as well as age groups to provide a more holistic approach to mental health treatment as well as promote protective factors such as a positive cultural identity of immigrants in the United States and worldwide.
Elsevier,

Mental and Behavioral Health of Immigrants in the United States, Cultural, Environmental, and Structural Factors, 2020, Pages 219-252

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by addressing the prevalence of mental disorders among the ethnic minority groups (African American, Latinx, and Asian American) in the United States according to immigration status.
Elsevier,

Confronting Prejudice and Discrimination, The Science of Changing Minds and Behaviors, 2019, Pages 3-28

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by examining predicted and actual personal responses to racism and sexism by targets of bias and by nontarget group witnesses.
Elsevier,

Confronting Prejudice and Discrimination, The Science of Changing Minds and Behaviors, 2019, Pages 275-297

This chapter advances SDGs 3 and 10 by proposing that patient confrontation of physician bias may serve as a self-advocacy tool that reduces physician bias and improves quality of patient care.
Elsevier,

Navigating Academia, A Guide for Women and Minority STEM Faculty, 2015, Pages 155-168

This chapter advances SDG 4, 5, and 10 by exploring the known reasons why African-Americans do not pursue or persist in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines in general and in computing sciences in particular.

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