COP26 Special Issue: UN Climate Change Conference 2021

COP26 is the 2021 United Nations annual climate change conference. COP stands for Conference of the Parties. Parties are the signatories of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) - a treaty agreed in 1994 which has 197 Parties (196 countries and the EU). The 2021 conference, hosted by the UK, together with our partners Italy, in Glasgow, will be the 26th meeting of the Parties, which is why it's called COP26.

United Nations climate change conferences are among the largest international meetings in the world. The negotiations between governments are complex and involve officials from every country in the world as well as representatives from civil society and the global news media.

To build momentum for this pivotal event, we're sharing a curated list of impactful book chapters and journal articles that will drive research and deliver meaningful ways to take positive environmental action.

Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Green and Sustainable Chemistry, Volume 31, 2021, 100504

Recent advances in electrochemically mediated CO2 capture and release using redox-active sorbents and mediators.
Elsevier,

Government Information Quarterly, Volume 37, October 2020

It ties to goal 12 and goal 7 by focusing on how energy consumption can be reduced in Europe.
Elsevier,

Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, September 2020

No-till alone is not sufficient as a management practice to improve environmental quality.No-till should be integrated with cover crops to improve its environmental quality benefits. Cover crops tighten nutrient cycling in no-till system. Cover crops may reduce herbicide needs and absorb residual chemicals.
Elsevier,

Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, September 2020

Climate change requires joint actions between government and local actors. Those most affected by climate change are populations in coastal regions that face extreme weather events and sea-level increases. In this article, geospatial perception of climate change is identified, and the research parameters are quantified.
Elsevier,

Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, September 2020

Agriculture consumes huge amounts of water in China and is profoundly affected by climate change.
Elsevier,

Geography and Sustainability, Volume 1, September 2020

Climate, land use and land cover (LULC) changes are among the primary driving forces of soil loss. As climate change (i.e., increasing rainfall) did not affect plant performance in Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) area, our findings suggested that ecological restoration was more beneficial to curb the amount of soil loss caused by urbanization and dam construction.
Elsevier,

Materials Today Sustainability, Volume 9, September 2020

Solar light-driven water splitting to store and use abundant solar energy in the form of gaseous hydrogen.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research, Volume 13, August 2020

Decades of population-based health outcomes data highlight the importance of understanding how environmental exposures in pregnancy affect maternal and neonatal outcomes. In this review, we consider how alterations to the maternal and or fetal/infant microbiome through environmental exposures could directly and indirectly alter fetal programming. We highlight two specific environmental exposures, cadmium (Cd) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and outline their effects on the developing fetus and the perinatal (maternal and fetal/infant) microbiome. We further consider how chemical exposures in the setting of natural disasters may be of particular importance to environmental health.
Elsevier,

Journal for Nurse Practitioners, Volume 16, June 2020

Climate change has been associated with deleterious health effects including heat stress in vulnerable populations. Older adults are at increased risk for heat-related morbidity and mortality, which are preventable. Through a case study approach, educating nurse practitioners about climate-related heat stress is an approach to education about health consequences of climate change.
Elsevier,

Current Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research, Volume 11, April 2020

Climate change is exposing terrestrial mammals to heat and aridity more frequently, limiting the supply of energy and water, with consequences for the survival and performance of mammals. The endocrine system is central to the response of animals to these environmental challenges and the maintenance of homoeostasis in different physiological systems. We review recent research on how the endocrine systems that are responsible for the maintenance of thermoregulation, osmoregulation, metabolism, and reproduction are affected by heat, reduced water, and reduced food availability. Then, we reflect on the value of this knowledge to assess the capacity of terrestrial species to cope with a changing and unpredictable future climate.

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